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Tour this Eccentric London Home Where Cosy Furnishings and Eccentric Art Collide in Every Room

This London home in a 200-year-old heritage building takes cues from Hygge and Wabi Sabi for an effortlessly stylish abode

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By Kimberley Schoeman  | January 31, 2024 | Interiors

This London home truly embraces the concept of Le flaneur and marries wabi-sabi, which is the true passion and belief of the home’s interior designer Marie Soliman, founder and creative director of Bergman Design House.

“There is so much history, fun and beauty behind hunting the good antique pieces that create a very original design story! I love color, I am a risk taker, and curious all the time, and I love telling stories,” says Marie Soliman.

The project was a full transformation that took 24 months from concept to completion. Designed for a British couple and their children who live in this home full time, the beautiful listed architecture and a hint of wabi-sabi marry the beauty of things imperfect and impermanent, which were brilliantly used to introduce a different meaning of luxury.

The project was a full transformation that took 24 months from concept to completion. Photography by Nick Smith.

The Grade I listed building was originally constructed some 200 years ago on the edge of Regent’s Park in London. Buckingham Palace architect John Nash’s iconic Park Crescent has been reborn as Regent’s Crescent, a collection of 68 refined residences befitting their royal pedigree.

“Grade I listed projects are both challenging and hugely rewarding, and with Regent’s Crescent, we have the rare opportunity to honor John Nash’s extraordinary talent and creative vision” explains Marie Soliman, founder and creative director of Bergman Design House.

The open space is huge and the client was worried that it wouldn't feel intimate enough as a lounge space. Photography by Nick Smith.

Creating Hygge into a Grade I–listed London building

The open space is huge and the client was worried that it wouldn't feel intimate enough as a lounge space. So the design team focused on how to create a Hygge feeling and bring warmth to this space.

The house celebrates its heritage while giving the handsome building a fresh lease of life. Existing period details have been restored or seamlessly added and more contemporary furniture brings a new layer of design to an impeccable base.

Existing period details have been restored or seamlessly added and more contemporary furniture brings a new layer of design to an impeccable base. Photography by Nick Smith.

The exceptional scale of the building is enhanced by the addition of a bespoke lighting installation, while materials include natural exotic marble, which reflects the light in interesting ways. Contemporary craftsmanship honours the original grandeur, the result is an exceptional home that is the perfect backdrop for enjoying London life at its finest.

Sources of inspiration

Cues from the revived architecture and bringing the beautiful London Regent’s Park landscapes in. Introducing subtle hints of elegant details to conjure glamorous yet understated spaces replete with plaster mouldings, herringbone floors, and marble fireplaces.

A magical lighting installation and art piece by Zhuang Hong Yi that changes full colours when walking around it. The impasto strokes of daring and bright colours are expressive and unconfined. Colours melt together and paint drips down the canvas, seeping over a collage of delicately unfolded rice paper flowers. The almost sculptural three-dimensionality, messiness, variety and chance are all embraced, drawing the viewer in, and encouraging contemplation.

In the main bedroom: pale apricot against a mocha crushed linen walls style; de Gournay whimsical Wisteria hand painted silk wall covering. Photography by Nick Smith.

“Colour is the spirit of a room, its heart and soul. It’s an amazing way to show who you are as a person.” says Marie Soliman. “One of my favourite tricks is to start with art. Usually the art you are drawn to has the colours you like, and from that piece of art you can build your own palette for the space. Then, have one statement piece of furniture that stands out in the room, detailing and layers.”

The hard finishes palette had a hint of heritage: beautiful chocolate herringbone floors; muted oyster coloured walls; striking pale blue with russet vein rich stone for the kitchen bar as the heart of the living room space; rare exotic marble (four seasons) jewellery inspired colours for the whisky corner over the views.

In the den, rich muddy teals and hints of flora and fauna creating a private member club feel; the opposite to the main breathy and fresh/ light main lounge. Photography by Nick Smith.

The designers wanted a capturing atmosphere that would make you look twice yet to convey undeniable comfort. This home celebrates the owners’ art collection and their love of discovering pieces and displaying them in style.

“The art you are drawn to has the colours you like, and from that piece of art you can build your own palette for the space,” says the home’s interior design Marie Soliman. Photography by Nick Smith.

“It is a listed building with impressive views over Kensington Gardens, so we devised ways to create a feeling of openness without touching the fabric of the building,” says Marie Soliman.

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