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My Milan: Ceramic designer Jan Ernst’s Top 5 Finds at the Fair

An expert’s eye on the standout designs that showed at this year’s fair

By House & Garden South Africa | June 14, 2022 | Design

As the world’s biggest design fair, Salone can be overwhelming – in fact, design fatigue is probably the only thing you can be sure to experience. That is, of course, if you were lucky enough to get a visa in time and make it to Milan. So, in the interest of a more democratic, accessible and frankly less fatiguing viewpoint on the Fair, we tasked local creatives who were in attendance to share their greatest hits in a week-long review series we’re calling My Milan. Up first, ceramic designer Jan Ernst.

Wendell Castle

Big D / 2017 is a sculptural wooden seating design by American designer Wendell Castle was showcased by The Carpenters Workshop Gallery and is a delicate combination of seriousness and delight. Apart from its well-articulated 3D form, the work is technically excellent with the seat cantilevering of an organic base.

Wendell Castle

Maison Armand Joncers

The word Tatau in Tahitian means ‘to hit’ and translates into Tattoo today. This idea forms the basis for the engraved oxidised maillechort side table by Maison Armand Joncers. The top has a bulbous form that appears to be dissected and etched with fine line work. This design can be appreciated for its evocative physical form, but also the space it creates around it with golden light reflecting off it.

Maison Armand Joncers

Khaled El Mays

Khaled El Mays is a design studio from Beirut known for its bold use of colour, natural textures, and pattern. As part of a bigger collection at Nilufar Gallery, the Snake Floor lamp is quirky and thought-provoking. The organic coiled form is made from French oak and adorned with leather.

Khaled El Mays

Cabana Studio

Exhibiting in the Baranzate Atelier space, the table designed by Cabana Studio is the perfect marriage of two natural materials. The stone base appears to be untouched, while the timber top is highly refined with striking detailing. The connection point between the two materials is the highlight of this design and is full of complexity and tension as the top appears to have been forced over the stone.

Cabana Studio

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On the slightly controversial side, the red 3D-textile mirror demands ownership of the space it hangs in as part of the Alcova design district. It is impossible not to stand in front of the mirror and ask a thousand questions (even while giggling like a schoolboy).

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